What Does The Word ‘Rotten’ Mean In Hebrew?

The word rotten is still one we use today and for the most part, the word hasn’t changed much. However, we will still take a look at what the word rotten means in Hebrew and Greek.

But first, let’s take a look at what the definition to the word rotten is in the 1828 Noah Webster’s Dictionary:

1. Putrid; carious; decomposed by the natural process of decay; as a rotten plank.

2. Not firm or trusty; unsound; defective in principle; treacherous; deceitful.

3. Defective in substance; not sound or hard.

4. Fetid; ill smelling.”

All scriptures are taken from NKJV unless otherwise marked.

Man decays like a rotten thing, Like a garment that is moth-eaten.”

– Job 13:28

What Does The Word ‘Rotten’ Mean In Hebrew?

malach- rag or old garment; rotten rags.

abash- to dry up.

raqab- decay by caries; rottenness; rotten thing.

riqqabown- decay by caries; rotten.

“A sound heart is life to the body, But envy is rottenness to the bones.”

– Proverbs 14:30

Related: What Does The Word ‘Idol’ Mean In Hebrew and Greek?

Conclusion

As you can see, the word rotten hasn’t lost a lot of its original meaning. Not surprisingly, the word rotten is often used in ‘scary scriptures.’ You know, those bible verses that make you shudder with the fear of God and give Him praise because He decided to save you.

Anyway, that’s what the word rotten means in Hebrew and Greek. I pray you found this article helpful. If so, please share this content. Also, feel free to share any thoughts in the comments below. As always, thanks for reading.

“Therefore, as the fire devours the stubble, And the flame consumes the chaff, So their root will be as rottenness, And their blossom will ascend like dust; Because they have rejected the law of the Lord of hosts, And despised the word of the Holy One of Israel.”

– Isaiah 5:24

What does the word rotten mean in Hebrew and Greek?

What does the word rotten mean in Hebrew and Greek?

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